OZ COLLECTION PLATE

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BIG METAL TREE -

In the 1950s and 1960s most Australian homes had a Hills Hoist. The idea was first dreamt up in 1895 but was designed in 1925 and only started being sold by Lance Hill in 1947, who built them in his backyard.

It became popular in the 1960s during the housing boom after the Second World War and families have been using this big metal tree for drying clothes since and is considered an icon of Australian suburbia.

. Inspired and designed in Melbourne + made in Arita, Japan
. Made using a 400 year old tradition
. Arita porcelain
. Cobalt blue
. 15 cm diameter
. For display or to serve
. Comes with matching box and information insert

FOOTY -

Woven into the fabric of Australian society, Australian Rules has often been difficult to describe. The quick speed and lack of an offside rule tends to produce a spectacle of complete chaos.

Invented in Melbourne and first played amongst private schools in the 1850s, Australian Rules was codified in 1858, predating other modern football games. Tom Wills, one of the founders advocated Australian Rules as a way of keeping cricketers fit during winter off-season.

The exact ori

TRAM WAYS

Connecting places, people and communities, trams have operated continuously in Victoria since 1884. Melbourne is the only city in Australia with an extensive tram network in operation. Consisting of 250 km of track, 487 trams, 30 routes, 1,763 tram stops, and an annual total of 182.7 million passenger trips, the network is the largest in the world.

When people think of Melbourne, they think of trams.

. Inspired and designed in Australia + crafted in Arita, Japan
. Made using a 400 year old tradition
. Arita porcelain
. Traditional cobalt blue
. 15 cm diameter
. For display or to serve
. Dishwasher and microwave safe
. Comes with matching gift box and information insert

gins of Australian Rules are a little unclear with suggestions the game was inspired by the Aboriginal game of Marngrook, which involved kicking a possum skin filled with charcoal.

. Inspired and designed in Australia + crafted in Arita, Japan
. Made using a 400 year old tradition
. Arita porcelain
. Traditional cobalt blue
. 15 cm diameter
. For display or to serve
. Dishwasher and microwave safe
. Comes with matching gift box and information insert
. Collect them all

In 1974, Stephen Hawking theorised that under certain conditions, small black holes might “evaporate” — and simultaneously emit radio signals. These black holes were the mass of Mount Everest, and smaller than an atom. Soon after, Australian physicist and engineer John O’Sullivan and his team tried to find these signals.

They never did find the black holes but in 1992, realised the mathematics and technologies they developed potentially solved the problem for computer networks needing to communicate wirelessly and paved the way for Wi-Fi development.

Today Wi-Fi is ubiquitous and used in a myriad of devises globally — this invention is a story that Australians can be proud of.

. Inspired and designed in Australia + crafted in Arita, Japan
. Made using a 400 year old tradition
. Arita porcelain
. Traditional cobalt blue
. 15 cm diameter
. For display or to serve
. Dishwasher and microwave safe
. Comes with matching gift box and information insert